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ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The Latest on a series of earthquakes on the boundary of Canada and Alaska (all times local):

12:10 p.m.

Teachers say students in an Alaska village are more excited about an upcoming fishing trip than a major earthquake.

Head teacher Kathryn Carl says the school in Klukwan (KLUK-wahn) didn’t have any damage from the magnitude-6.2 quake that hit early Monday in British Columbia near the Alaska border.

The village is 41 miles (66 kilometers) from the quake, which was followed by a series of aftershocks, including a magnitude-6.3 quake about two hours later.

The shaking woke Carl. She says she thought her 80-pound Karelian bear dog had jumped on the bed.

There also was no damage in the city of Haines, about 60 miles from the quake.

Police Chief Heath Scott says a picture frame fell off his file cabinet but he saw no damage as he drove around the city of 2,500.

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11 a.m.

A large earthquake and its aftershocks roused and unsettled some Alaska lawmakers.

State Rep. Charisse Millett was asleep in Juneau, 134 miles away from the quake, when the shaking started around 4:30 a.m. Monday.

While the Anchorage Republican has experienced earthquakes before, she is used to them being shorter.

The U.S. Geological Survey says a magnitude-6.2 earthquake shook the corner of British Columbia, near the boundary with Alaska, followed nearly two hours later by a magnitude-6.3 aftershock in the same area.

The shaking roused state Rep. Scott Kawasaki, who spent the night at his Capitol office in Juneau. He said he was reminded of and grateful for recent renovations meant to fortify the Capitol against earthquakes.

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7:45 a.m.

The U.S. Geological Survey says a magnitude-6.3 aftershock has shaken the corner of British Columbia, near the boundary with Alaska, nearly two hours after a magnitude-6.2 earthquake hit the same area.

Geophysicist Amy Vaughan says it’s not completely uncommon for an aftershock to be larger than the triggering quake, though normally the following quakes are smaller. She says there’s been a series of aftershocks ranging from magnitudes 2 to 5.

The initial large quake hit around 4:30 a.m. Monday about 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of the tiny Alaska town of Mosquito Lake and about 83 miles (134 kilometers) southwest of Whitehorse, Canada.

The large aftershock struck within a few miles.

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5:45 a.m.

The U.S. Geological Survey says a magnitude-6.2 earthquake has rattled the corner of British Columbia, near the boundary with Alaska.

Geophysicist Amy Vaughan says the shallow, early Monday quake struck about 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of the tiny Alaska town of Mosquito Lake and about 83 miles (134 kilometers) southwest of Whitehorse, Canada.

At least three aftershocks have been recorded, and Vaughan expected more.

She says this type of quake has the potential to cause damage but that the location dropped the chances of major problems. Vaughan says it would have jarred people awake and knocked items off shelves.

Jaimie Lawson, a 911 dispatcher with the Skagway Police Department, says the remote town 55 miles (89 kilometers) from the quake hasn’t received calls about damage or injuries.

The geological survey website has recorded hundreds of reports of people feeling the shaking.

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