From quarterly food deliveries to fun cookbooks, here are five creative ideas for food lovers:

Global bacon: Forget the fruit o' the month club. Belcampo had us at “bacon.” Anya Fernald's Belcampo Meat Co. is all about sustainably, humanely raised meat, raised on their pastureland, butchered in their processing plant and sold from their storefront and restaurant at Larkspur's Marin Country Mart. Your favorite foodie can enjoy quarterly deliveries of five pounds of bacon, made from organic, pastured Ossabaw-Berkshire heritage pigs. The January delivery, for example, includes classic bacon and guanciale, an unsmoked Italian riff that comes from the pig's cheek — yummy in pasta, divine on pizza. April features classic and English-style back bacon, July is pancetta month, and October brings a smoky, coffee-rubbed bacon. ($299 for four deliveries of five pounds each;www.belcampomeatco.com)

Salumi socks: Tasty salted pork products and socks — could there be a better match? San Francisco chef Chris Cosentino certainly didn't think so. Struck by the striking similarity between tube socks and sausages, Cosentino thought, “Salami comes in a tube. Why not salami socks?” Why not indeed? Everyone needs a three-pack of these socks, printed in mortadella, sopressata and prosciutto designs. (They even come with sock insurance, in case Fido absconds with your footwear or your washing machine turns sock-ivorous.) For added gift-giving oomph, pair the meat feet with edible salumi — or Cosentino's Marvel comic book, “Wolverine in the Flesh” — from his Boccalone Salumeria in the San Francisco Ferry Plaza Marketplace. (Socks $33, www.betabrand.com. Find salumi, Boccalone gear and the Marvel comic book at www.boccalone.com)

The Bay Area's cooking schools boast every variety of culinary experience, from dim sum how-tos at Berkeley's Kitchen on Fire ($85) to the sommelier-in-the-making courses at Campbell's International Culinary Center ($9,975 for the 10-week intensive course). But if you're looking for something really unusual, the possibilities range from a hibachi-and-knife-skills class ($250) that lets you channel your inner Benihana master, to a one-on-one pasta-making lesson with Flour+Water's Thomas McNaughton ($1,950 for six).